Category Archives: Abstracts

Attempts made to break outside of my engineering mentality

Tying Things Together

A.E. Larson Building Entry Foyer, Yakima, WA

This image ties the images from the two prior posts together.  The contrast here are the differences in the design elements (triangular geometric vs. sweeping curves, color vs. monochrome, and smooth marble vs. sculptured metal).  The horizontal (diagonal) lines of the cornice moulding and the vertical lines of the wall designs also provide a geometric contrast.

Desert Walk

Spent Flower on Desert Walk

The beauty in the desert is everywhere. As I walk along, I see volcanic rock outcroppings, struggling junipers, cragged old trees, blue-grey sagebrush, patches of colorful wildflowers, beautiful blue sky with billowing white clouds.  I look down at my feet, magic appears.

Crater Lake Chieftain

“Chieftain of the Lake”

Looking vs Seeing?  My friend and I stopped to look at a nice view of Crater Lake.  Almost simultaneously we saw an Indian chieftain calmly looking over the lake.  My friend wrote this poem highlighting her experience.

              Crater Lake

The first peoples first gazed upon
the deepest blue, and 
their hearts were moved.
 
The rocks understood their respect
and formed a bond between 
humankind and nature.
 
The natural world honored
the chief who presided, wise enough
to know he was only bits of dust.
 
And it is all dust that through the
Creator exists, waiting for the
great merging of beauty and love.
 
– Mary Dahlin

Sometimes Simpler is Better

Philodendron Leaf, Hawaiian Botanical Gardens

I enjoy photographing botanical subjects.  When reviewing my work, many times I quickly pass over an image that at first does not catch my eye as a “select”. I was going through some images that I photographed a year ago in Hawaii.  This image just grabbed me.  Instead of a leaf, I saw bright lines radiating out, I saw shadows and voids.  I saw a triangular shape inserting itself into a void.  The green color did not add anything to the image, I thought black and white.  The image emerged.

A Time to Reflect

“Reflection”

Today is a special day to reflect.  Life’s timeline is multidimensional.  The past, current, and future intermingle.  As I look back and reflect on loved ones who have passed, a warm, peaceful, and grateful feeling comes into my heart. That feeling transcends into a contemplative outlook of what is yet to come.

Beauty of Molokai 1

Art, Color and Beauty are Everywhere

I recently attended a contemplative photography retreat at beautiful Hui Ho’olana on Moloka’i.  The next several posts will be from the retreat.

Beauty was everywhere I looked.  It presented itself along every path, around every corner. It seemed that it was just asking to be photographed.  

Red, green and yellow
Spiked leaves shoot out like a star
Just asking to be noticed

What is Behind?

Door Handles – Raymond Library, Yakima Valley College

My friend exclaimed “LOOK!”.  I turned and saw these interesting door handles.  They looked more like little sculptures than handles.  As I squinted, the glass doors became darker and the light reflecting off the handles became less harsh.  It gave me a little feeling of mystery, “What is behind these doors?”.

Diagonals and Contrast

“Diagonals and Contrast”

Look forward, turn and look around, look down, look up … it is amazing what gifts are out there waiting to be received. Light, shadows, shapes, diagonals abound everywhere.  It is ours for the seeing.  This simple skylight in Glenn Anthon Hall (Yakima Valley College) caught my interest.  I just walked around to get the diagonal perspectives and balance I was looking for.

Contemplative Photography Lesson

Sunlit Entryway – Yakima, WA

I have been working to develop my process for contemplative photography.  My assignment today was to take a walk with a fresh open mind not looking for any specific thing to photograph.  The practice objective was to just wander and let the world around me catch my eye.  If something caught my eye, I needed to keep my mind open, take my time, and explore specifically what was it that captured my eye, what was important, and what was not.  Only then I could raise my camera and frame the image.

Walking along Front Street, I saw a bright orange flash that stopped me dead in my tracks.  It was in stark contrast with the surrounding area of old stucco and bricks. Shadows from a metal gate added to the contrast.  Soft mottled shadows from a street tree graced its surface.  The vertical bars of the gate framed the brilliant orange.  What a wonderful gift I was given.