Category Archives: B&W Photography

What the ?????

“Out My Bedroom Window”

I was enjoying my morning cup of coffee, looked out the window, and saw this weird cloud formation.  I dropped everything and rushed to get my camera.  Luckily I had the right lens and was able to get a quick photo of this cloud spiral before it dissipated.  A few seconds later it was gone.  I have never seen such a cloud phenomenon.  I have no clue what could have caused it here in Eastern Washington.  I wonder if it was a mini cyclone??? 

The mysteries of nature engulf my imagination.  The more I stop to contemplate what is going around me, the more wonder I see and feel.  I feel grateful to witness such events and even more lucky if I have a camera near by.  It is time to celebrate the wonderful world around me.

History in My Backyard

Selah – Naches Irrigation Flume

A few days ago we had a light snow.  I gazed our from my kitchen window and became fixated on the wonderful piece of history in my backyard.  The snow provided a nice contrast between the irrigation flume’s wood structure and the sagebrush speckled background.

This piece of history was built in 1892 to provide irrigation water to the Selah Valley.  Over the years, much of the canal has been upgraded and the wooden flumes torn down.  I am lucky to have one of the few remaining sections above my home.  I currently get my irrigation water directly from this flume.  Sadly, it won’t be for too many additional years.  Plans are to replace this section with an underground pipe.  So until funds are available, I will enjoy what remains of our little bit of history.

Winding Walk

Gravel Walkway – Yakima Arboretum, WA

A straight line is not always the best way to get from point A to point B.  The path’s gentle bends direct my interest in multiple directions:  a beech grove to the right, a crabapple grove to the left, and a Japanese garden forward.  Each bend encourages a little side trip off the path for further exploration.

My Focus for 2019

Mighty Oak, Yakima Arboretum, WA

Over the years, I have taken multiple courses and attended many workshops to help me improve my photography skills.  I have practiced, practiced, and practiced.  I have experimented with many different techniques and processing methods.  Many times my images are only examples of different techniques and processes.  Many lack feeling or meaning.

This year, my focus will be to purposefully attempt to create the feeling/story that I am experiencing when I click the shutter.  I will attempt to use the different techniques and processes that I have learned in the past to achieve the desired end result.  I will think hard each time I click the shutter on what I am trying to accomplish.  I will continue to play and experiment in order to see what works and what doesn’t for a specific image.  I will continue to create sketch images to explore and find interesting ways to portray what is in front of my eyes.  The difference will be that I will attempt to do the above in a much more purposeful way than I have previously.

The above image is from a walk I took on a brisk winter day in the Yakima Arboretum.  My friend and I had the arboretum almost to ourselves.  Walking along the oak alley, I wanted to record an image depicting the strength, shape, character and size of the oak trees.  I took images of the grove from a distance.  I took images of individual oak trees showing their overall size and shape.  I took close ups of the sun shining on the bark and leaves.  Then I looked directly above me and saw everything come together into a single image:  a strong trunk, the remnant leaves on the lower branches, the delicate branches extending upward to the sky.  I snuggled up to the trunk and shot upward with a wide angle lens setting. I was thinking black and white to match the brisk cool temperature of a winter afternoon. 

 

How Lucky We Are!

Civil War Monument and Capitol, WDC

How lucky we are to live in such a great Nation! The current time is extremely challenging and full of discord.  But it is not even close to the times our Nation bas persevered in the past.  On a recent visit to Washington DC, I walked by this Civil War Memorial sculpture with the Capitol in the background.  It stimulated me to think about what our Nation was going through over 150 years ago.  So no matter how bad we may think things are now, lets have the strength and confidence that we all will survive together as a united Nation.

Related Images:

Crack in the Ground

“Crack in the Ground”, Lake County, Oregon

Above, a lone sagebrush and sun appear.
The sagebrush peers over the edge watching me.
The sun’s bright fire lights my way.

I have always been fascinated by the unusual geological formations in the eastern Washington/Oregon landscape.  A few weeks ago, several college friends and I went exploring around Christmas Valley, Oregon.  Our first stop was “Crack in the Ground” (see excerpt from Wikipedia below}.  Most of the group scurried along the bottom of the fissure.  I, along  with a special friend, stopped, gazed around in wonderment, and photographed whatever jumped out at me.  By the time the group had walked to the end, walked back to the start, and then walked back to fine us, we had only covered about one half of the distance.  My mind and eyes wondered at every turn.  I am a wondering explorer, not a hiker.

From Wikipedia:

Crack in the Ground is a volcanic fissure about 2 miles (3.2 km) long with depths measuring nearly 30 feet (9 m) below ground level in Central Oregon, United States. The eruptions from the Four Craters Lava Field were accompanied by a slight sinking of the older rock surface, forming a shallow, graben-like structure about 2 miles (3.2 km) wide and extending to the south into an old lake basin. Crack in the Ground marks the western edge of this small, volcano-tectonic depression. The crack is the result of a tension fracture along a hingeline produced by the draping of Green Mountain lava flows over the edge of upthrown side of the concealed fault zone. The fissure is located at the southwest corner of Four Craters Lava Field in the Deschutes National Forest.

Crack in the Ground is estimated to have been created around 1,000 years ago.

Hoar Frost in June

Road to Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, WA

I wasn’t expecting to see Hoar Frost in mid-June.  The conditions were just right as we were driving up to Hurricane Ridge, moist fog and cold temperature.  As soon as I saw the light mist, the frost covered trees, and the contrasting  rock outcroppings, I thought of B&W.  Magic happens!