Category Archives: B&W Photography

Crack in the Ground

“Crack in the Ground”, Lake County, Oregon

Above, a lone sagebrush and sun appear.
The sagebrush peers over the edge watching me.
The sun’s bright fire lights my way.

I have always been fascinated by the unusual geological formations in the eastern Washington/Oregon landscape.  A few weeks ago, several college friends and I went exploring around Christmas Valley, Oregon.  Our first stop was “Crack in the Ground” (see excerpt from Wikipedia below}.  Most of the group scurried along the bottom of the fissure.  I, along  with a special friend, stopped, gazed around in wonderment, and photographed whatever jumped out at me.  By the time the group had walked to the end, walked back to the start, and then walked back to fine us, we had only covered about one half of the distance.  My mind and eyes wondered at every turn.  I am a wondering explorer, not a hiker.

From Wikipedia:

Crack in the Ground is a volcanic fissure about 2 miles (3.2 km) long with depths measuring nearly 30 feet (9 m) below ground level in Central Oregon, United States. The eruptions from the Four Craters Lava Field were accompanied by a slight sinking of the older rock surface, forming a shallow, graben-like structure about 2 miles (3.2 km) wide and extending to the south into an old lake basin. Crack in the Ground marks the western edge of this small, volcano-tectonic depression. The crack is the result of a tension fracture along a hingeline produced by the draping of Green Mountain lava flows over the edge of upthrown side of the concealed fault zone. The fissure is located at the southwest corner of Four Craters Lava Field in the Deschutes National Forest.

Crack in the Ground is estimated to have been created around 1,000 years ago.

Hoar Frost in June

Road to Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, WA

I wasn’t expecting to see Hoar Frost in mid-June.  The conditions were just right as we were driving up to Hurricane Ridge, moist fog and cold temperature.  As soon as I saw the light mist, the frost covered trees, and the contrasting  rock outcroppings, I thought of B&W.  Magic happens!

Sometimes Simpler is Better

Philodendron Leaf, Hawaiian Botanical Gardens

I enjoy photographing botanical subjects.  When reviewing my work, many times I quickly pass over an image that at first does not catch my eye as a “select”. I was going through some images that I photographed a year ago in Hawaii.  This image just grabbed me.  Instead of a leaf, I saw bright lines radiating out, I saw shadows and voids.  I saw a triangular shape inserting itself into a void.  The green color did not add anything to the image, I thought black and white.  The image emerged.

What is Behind?

Door Handles – Raymond Library, Yakima Valley College

My friend exclaimed “LOOK!”.  I turned and saw these interesting door handles.  They looked more like little sculptures than handles.  As I squinted, the glass doors became darker and the light reflecting off the handles became less harsh.  It gave me a little feeling of mystery, “What is behind these doors?”.

What is the Clock Tower Doing in This Building?

Raymond Library – Yakima Valley College

What in the heck is the Clock Tower doing in the Library?  It doesn’t belong there! That thought flashed through my mind as I was strolling around the YVC campus this past weekend.

This is a good example of seeing the unusual in the usual.  The contrast made the image interesting to me.

Diagonals and Contrast

“Diagonals and Contrast”

Look forward, turn and look around, look down, look up … it is amazing what gifts are out there waiting to be received. Light, shadows, shapes, diagonals abound everywhere.  It is ours for the seeing.  This simple skylight in Glenn Anthon Hall (Yakima Valley College) caught my interest.  I just walked around to get the diagonal perspectives and balance I was looking for.

An Unhappy Pair

Nesting Blue Herons – Florida

One year ago, I and a couple of great friends were getting ready to go down to Florida to photograph at the Space Coast Birding and Wildlife Festival. I am not a wildlife photographer, even though I work hard at it when I get a chance. What I enjoy the most is just watching the bird or animal behavior.  If a good image comes to me, I will gladly receive it.

We watched this pair of herons at a wetlands reserve between Titusville and Orlando.  They had quite an interesting behavior pattern.  The female (the one behind) was not a very faithful partner.  The male would leave the female to gather more twigs to build the nest.  While he was away, another male would fly in and mate with the female.  The first male would see the other and rush in with his beak filled with a branch chasing the second male away.  He would stay in the nest with ruffled feathers for a while, then go back out and collect more branches.  As soon as he left, the other male would fly back in.  This occurred over and over while we watched the show. 

I may be imagining this, to me it looks like the male in the foreground looks a little pissed off, while the female looks a little bored and disgruntled.

Not Every Sunrise is Bright

Misty Morning from My Backyard

The few days prior to this were beautiful orange and pink sunrises. The previous days in late November had been warm.  During the night, the temperature had dropped.  I was drinking my morning cup of coffee looking out over my back yard, waiting for another brilliant sunrise.  I was surprised as the sun creeped over the horizon exposing this misty view of the valley below.  Each morning has its unique beauty.