Category Archives: The Intimate Landscape

The small details, shapes, and textures that catch my eye.

I Need a Little Brightness

Portland Japanese Gardens

Today is an overcast dark day.  I need a little brightness!  

Yesterday I visited the Portland Japanese Gardens.  Even though the day was overcast and a bit drizzly, the bright fall colors of this Japanese maple brightened the surroundings and captured my eye.  The fall color was past its prime.  But, there was still quite a bit of color patches.  I thought the gardens were beautiful and can just imagine what they were like during their prime color.  Next fall I will return during the peak.

P.S.  I was practicing working with light and found this brilliant reflection.

Great Memories

“The Columns” – Sylvan Theater, University of Washington Campus

A couple of weeks ago, I spent several hours walking around the University of Washington campus.  I had not been there for about 15 years.  How much things have changed.  My old hangout, the EEB (Electrical Engineering Building) has been completely remodeled and enlarged with a large new section for Computer Science..  When I was there, Computer Science was just a small part of the EE Department.  Now it is its own Department with over 1300 students.

During class breaks, I use to go to the Sylvan Theater and the Columns just behind the EEB.  It was a wonderful peaceful place to sit and wonder about what the future would bring,  The Sylvan Theater was just about the same as I recall it was 50 years ago.  However, there were several students there with hard hats, surveying equipment, and tape measures.  They were taking measurements to design a new courtyard to replace a good part of the grass.  I feel a little sorrow to see my old memories change.  But I guess it is for the best.  Those memories are great ones!

 

Filtered Rays

“Morning Sun Rays”

I was exploring another area of the Heceta Lighthouse Park most of the morning.  I had not come up with anything interesting. I felt a little “down” because nothing had “come to me”. Walking back to my car I saw a couple of our workshop participants shooting into the woods.  I walked up and saw the beautiful filtered light they had observed.  Usually I do not like to “copy” an image/view that another has discovered.  But, I could not help myself this time.

Terry, this is your image.  It just happened to appear in my camera as well.  Thank you!

In the Mist

“The Face in the Mist”

On one of our workshop days we went down to Bandon beach early in the morning.  The fog covered many of the sea stacks.  Gradually the fog lifted and I was able to get this exposure.  My intent was to create a mood of a misty morning filled with gentle soft light, an awakening of the Indian maiden in the sea.

Survival

“Struggling for Life”

These two trees struggling for life caught my attention while I was doing some long exposure photography.  My interest quickly focused on them.  I walked around to get the best perspective I could find.  I focused on keeping the angle of the trees leaning to the center, maintaining a separation between the small sea stack and the cliff, and eliminating some distracting rocks and dirt on the right edge.  I blended two images together to achieve a tonal range between the sky and the cliff.  I did a little dodging on the tree trunks and a little burning in the sky to get the contrast I was looking for.

I am getting better at taking my time to look around before becoming engrossed in shooting.

 

Gazing Into the Sky

Face Rock – Bandon, Oregon

I looked and looked and looked.  I could not see the face that this rock was named after.  It was a dark, cloudy morning.  The sun broke through for a moment and lit up the side of the rock.  There was the face.

Can you see it.  Hint, it is looking up at the right corner of the image.

In the Rainforest

Hanging Moss – Hoh River Rainforest

It was mid morning on a bright sunny, hot, dry day.  The summer has been one of the driest in history.  It was not a typical rainforest day.  It was still a beautiful exhibition of nature.  I spent a lot of time looking around to find an area that had filtered light without glaring bright spots.  This is one that I found.

I processed the image to try to capture the feeling I had:  filtered rays of sunshine highlighting background trees, interesting moss shapes in the shadows speckled with sunlight, a soft feeling of the soft moss.

I must go back after a good drenching rain.

Renewal

Wildflowers on Johnson Ridge (Mt. St. Helens)

This image was taken on Johnson Ridge with Mt. St. Helens at my back. It shows the path of the destruction caused by the hot gases from the eruption.  Trees were blasted down for miles.  The little toothpicks on the far ridges were once towering firs.  Wildflowers and grasses have rejuvenated life in the area.  The contrasts between devastation and renewed life are beautiful and uplifting to my spirit.

Life Emerges from Devastation

Lupine and Mt. St. Helens’ Crater from Johnson Ridge

Mt. St. Helens eruption blasted directly over Johnson Ridge where this photo was taken.  The landscape was devastated,  Nothing was left standing or living.  Now the hill sides are covered with wildflowers and small trees.  This lupine stands defiant in front of the mountain.

 

How Fragile Basalt Can Be

Columnar Basalt Remains – Yellowstone National Park

I think of basalt as a hard, stable volcanic rock created from lava flows.  Columnar basalt is formed when lava cools slowly.  It forms multi-sided vertical columns as it cools.  These columns are characterized by horizontal fractures.  When the columns are exposed to rushing water, the water carves out these fractures and the columns collapse. This image illustrates the vertical basalt columns as well as the collapsed column residuals.