Tag Archives: geology

Yellowstone: Mammoth Hot Springs

Mammoth Hot Springs – Upper Basin

Yellowstone’s Mammoth Hot Springs area is also an area of unbelievable stark beauty.  How can life exist in such a harsh environment of boiling hot mineral springs.  I wonder how long these trees made it.

The day was hot around 90 degrees, we were tired and on our way back to photograph wildlife. We only took a few moments to walk around and take a couple of shots.  My creativity was at a low level, so I feel that I missed some wonderful opportunities to explore.  Well, next time …

Yellowstone: Grand Prismatic Spring – Lines 1

Grand Prismatic Spring -Mineral Flats

As the hot mineral water flows out of the spring, it creates a series of mineral flats.  This perspective  was a flat grey.  I decided to convert it  to black and white, add contrast, and apply a slight gradient across the image..

Yellowstone: Grand Prismatic Spring – Detail 1

Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

A boardwalk runs along the edge of the spring.  The reflection of people walking along the walk caught my eye when the mist periodically lifted.  I did not have the foresight to be patient and take an image with a light mist to create the mystic feeling I felt.  Lesson learned;  Be ready to capture a “feeling” and not just a “picture”.

 

Yellowstone: Grand Prismatic Spring

Grand Prismatic Hot Spring

The Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park is the largest hot spring in the United States and the third largest in the world.  The immensity of the spring is very difficult to capture from the ground level.  I had my 24-105mm lens and only could capture a portion of the spring.  I could not change to my 14mm wide angle because of the extreme harsh mist generated by the hot spring.  On my next visit I will make two trips to photograph from the ground level.  The first will be with my wide aperture lens to try to capture as much of the overall grandness of the spring.  The second will be with my mid-range zoom to capture the details. To get a full photo of the spring, one needs to hike up the trail on the hill above the spring.  The trail is currently (June 2017) in construction and not accessible..

I found the details of the water and mud beds below fascinating.  Lines, colors, and reflections intrigued me.  I will display images of some of those images in future posts.

Sentinel Gap on Columbia River

Sentinel Gap Looking South from Frenchman’s Spring Coulee

This image was taken from the bottom of Frenchman’s Spring Coulee near where it enters the Columbia River.  Sentinel Gap was cut across the Saddle Mountains by the Columbia River and the Ice Age Floods.  During the floods, the Columbia River was at a level near the top of the eastern slope of the Gap.  On the north side of the Gap, the Vantage Bridge and Wanapum Dam are faintly visible.  Through the Gap, Umatilla and Rattlesnake Ridges are visible.  And of course, the clouds make the image.

 

Frenchman’s Spring Coulee

Frenchman’s Spring Coulee – near Vantage, WA

This image is taken from the top of the Frenchman’s Spring Coulee looking down toward the Columbia River.  The mountains in the far background are the Cascade foothills. This coulee was created during the Ice Age Missoula Floods.  It is the farthest south water path from the Quincy Basin to the Columbia River.  The flood waters in the Quincy Basin were split by the Frenchman hills, just south of this coulee.  The water flowed east into the Drumheller Channels toward Othello and west into the Columbia River via several coulees including Frenchman Springs.

The wind was howling, so I did not feel like getting too close to the edge.  I bet this will make a good sunset or sunrise photo.  I will be back.

 

Drumheller Channels Pano

Drumheller Channels – Othello, Washington

This image is a hand-held pano taken above the Goose Lake trail head at the northern part of the Drumheller Channels reserve, just below O’Sullivan Dam.  This was our final stop on our Sandhill Crane photo shoot.  We took a leisurely hike (walk) to cap off a great trip.  Spring is a beautiful time to visit the Channels.  I was hoping for some big white puffy clouds.  But it just did not happen this trip.  I will return …

More Ice Age Geology – Corfu Landslide

Corfu Landslide – Saddle Mountains, Central Washington

This image was taken from  Lower Crab Creek Road.  It is a small section of the Corfu Landslide. Lower Crab creek is in the foreground. This part of the landslide was probably post Missoula Floods.  It looked like the rocks at the base were not eroded, hence it probably occurred following the last floods.  The land slide extends upward to the Saddle Mountains crest.  A couple of weeks prior to taking this image,  I was at the crest of the Mountain looking down.  Refer to my post of 27 March.