Tag Archives: long exposure

Another Set of Tools

Cape Perpetua – Central Oregon Coast

I just finished a workshop on the Oregon Coast with John Barclay and Cole Thompson.  I walked away with a new set of tools: Long exposure photography and B&W processing.  But what was more important, I reconfirmed why I photograph.  I do it for myself.  I do not do it for others.  If someone happens to like an image I create, I will give it to them as a gift.  That satisfies me.

I feel the same way about my website posts.  I do it for myself.  I record some of my thoughts at the time.  If someone is interested in what I do, I share the site with them.  I do not expect comments.

The above image was one of the last ones I took before heading back home.  I made a side trip to Cape Perpetua and Thor’s Well.  I finished taking images on the shore and packed up my gear.  Right before I got to the top of the hill, I Iooked up and saw fog coming in.  I stopped in my tracks and got my camera back out.  This was the first  long exposure I took.  The wind picked up quickly and the fog started coming in rapidly.  Below is my next image.  How quickly things change!  These images were taken 3 minutes apart, both with 2 minute exposures.

More Practice

Second Beach – La Push, WA

This image is another perspective from my long exposure practice exercise.  This time the focus was to highlight the sky and the smooth tide.  I used dodging and burning in the sky, dodging on the sea stack and water.  I am looking forward to an upcoming workshop on the Oregon Coast with John Barclay and Cole Thompson.  It should be enlightening.

Practice & Experiment

Second Beach, La Push, WA

I took a special trip to the Washington Coast to experiment and practice long exposure photography. My first day of practice resulted in a disappointing set of images with many, many, pure white and pure black frames.  I am thankful tor digital photography!  I knew the steps I needed to take.  However, my excitement took over and I made multiple mistakes.  Toward the end I started to engrain the process into my sequence of shooting.  The next morning, I slowed down and did much better.  This image is from that morning.  I have a lot more of experimenting and practicing to do.