Tag Archives: rocks

Alabama Hills #4

“Alien”

This image is a repeat of a prior post in 2018.  I was driving through the Alabama Hills, turned a corner and saw this strange looking alien staring right at me.  Chills ran down my back!  I quickly pulled off the road, let the dust settle, and introduced myself.  He didn’t say much and just frowned.  

Getting Ready …

Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, California

I am getting ready for a photography workshop with John Barclay and Mitch Dobrowner at Capitol Reef in southern Utah.  Part of the preparation is to select images of past work to show to the workshop group.  I’ve spent the last two days reviewing my images over the past year.  My focus for this workshop will be black and white photography.  Overall, I am disappointed in my progress in 2018.  I could not identify many individual stellar single images that stand completely by themselves.   However, I did notice that I have several good images when taken together tell a story of the feeling I had experiencing a particular site.  A collection of my images is stronger than any single image.  For the next few days I will post a series of images from the Alabama Hills last April.

The Alabama Hills is a series of rounded rock hills and rock formations on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range near Lone Pine, California.  Mt. Whitney towers above the range.  Since the 1920’s the rugged area has been used as a location for over 150 movies and TV show’s.

This image was taken looking northwest over some large boulders of the Alabama Hills toward the eastern Sierras.

Sometimes I Just Need to Play

Bandon Beach

I just got a new B&W conversion SW plug-in (Macphun Tonality).  I picked out some photos of the beach near Bandon, Oregon to work on.  I played around to explore some of the secondary features.  After converting to B&W I added a “misty/dreamy” look.  I then added a paper texture and a vignette.  Sometimes I just need to play to get my creative juices flowing.

Looking Back at Me

Salt Collecting Rocks at Lapakahi Historical Park

I was walking along a path in a historic Hawaiian Village when I saw this face looking back up at me.  I couldn’t resist stopping and capturing an image.  See the eyes, nose and mouth.

These small hollowed-out stones were used by the Hawaiians to collect salt. Sea water was poured into hollowed-out stones like these.  Sun evaporated the water leaving pa’akai (salt crystals.  Salt was used to preserve fish and season food.

Seeing the Beauty of the Little Things Around Us

Wildflowers – Snow Mountain Ranch

As I walked along the trail at Snow Mountain Ranch, I stopped frequently and just looked around enjoying the countryside.  Almost every time, something caught my eye.  This simple image of rocks and flowers was one of those moments.

Photography has taught me to see the beauty and interesting things around me.  Today, everywhere I look, I see something interesting that makes me step back and enjoy the moment.  When I become engrossed on a photographic subject, I feel like I become part of it.  I am no longer just an observer.

Missoula Floods: Sentinel Gap 2

Sentinel Gap, Washington

This image was taken north of Sentinel Gap, looking south.  The Columbia River is barely visible in the center of the photo.  During the Ice Age Missoula Floods, Crab Creek thundered through here joining the Columbia River.  This was the western path for the waters rushing through Drumheller Channels as it was diverted by the Saddle Mountains.  The small rocks in the foreground are likely to have been carried by the rush of water as it carved out the scablands through the Drumheller Channels.

Missoula Floods: Sentinel Gap

Sentinel Gap, Washington

This image was taken looking north through Sentinel Gap.  This gap cuts through the Saddle Mountains which separate the Pasco and Othello basins in Eastern Washington.  The Columbia River runs through this gap on its way to the Oregon/Washington border.  At the time of the Missoula Floods, the water level going through the gap reached the top of the left ridge, flowing into Lake Lewis which covered the Pasco basin.

The erratics in the foreground most likely are from the gap, carved away by the raging wall of water that flowed through it.

A Day in the Canyon: Abstract Art

Basalt, Yaklma River Canyon

These pieces of basalt (approximately 18 inches in length) caught my as I was exploring road cuts in the Yakima River Canyon.  They seemed to be accented by an artists brush.  Different patterns and different colors abounded in adjacent rocks.  Since the rocks were adjacent and seem to be part of the same basalt flow, why are they so different in surface color and pattern. I need to do a little research on what factors determine the color and patterns.