Tag Archives: snow

Experimenting with Moods

Pilot Peak

I am focusing on trying to create various moods with my black and white images.  This image of Pilot Peak was shot in midday light.  I added contrast along with dodging and burning to get this “late evening” mood.

The image below is processed with a B&W conversion with just a little contrast and brightness adjustment.  It captures more of the detail, but lacks feeling (my perspective).

What is your preference?

Symmetry

Beartooth Lake

One of the most beautiful scenic drives that I have been on is the Beartooth Highway from Cook City, Wyoming to Red Lodge, Montana. On the way up to the summit, I saw a small opening through the trees with a beautiful lake peeking between them.  I found a turnout and walked a short distance to see this beautiful scene.  The lake was smooth as glass, the sky was blue, and the snow beamed out its radiance.  Symmetry of the bluff reflecting in the lake was perfect.  It was mid-day, so the colors were muted.  But is was perfect for black and white.

Someday, I will be back for an early morning or late afternoon shot of the warm sun reflecting off the bluff into the lake.

When Will Spring Come?

150302_Chairs in Snow by . Fuji X-T1, XF18-135mm @ 59mm, f/8.0, 1/120 sec, ISO 1600

It is snowing again today and we are getting ready for another 8-10 inches in a couple of days.  Officially, Spring will come in less than three weeks.  When will it really come????

Even though I am tired of shoveling snow and chipping ice, I still appreciate the beauty of a snow covered landscape.  I hope to be able to get out and explore after the next snow fall.

Framed

150130_Framed Tree by . Fuji X-T1, XF18-135mm @ 52mm, f/11, 1/300 sec, ISO 1600

Walking around our back yard, I always look for different perspectives.  The weight of the snow on the foreground pine opened up a frame for the background leyland cyprus.  We planted these two trees when we first moved into the area to break up the open pasture of our back yard.  Fifteen years later they have changed the feeling of our back yard.

A Little Winter Color

150129_Bench in Snow by . Fuji X-T1, XF18-135mm @ 83mm, f/11, 1/170 sec, ISO 1600

The red twig dogwood adds a little color to the cold winter scene in our backyard perennial garden.  Of course, when I see red, I shoot.  During our walks in our backyard, Karen and I usually stop here and spend a quiet moment or two.  The bench is tucked in between shrubs and trees.  It is a nice private place in the middle of our wide open area.  Each spring I prune the dogwoods down to about 12 inches above the ground.  New shoots pop up to create a 5-6 foot bush each year.  Along with our winterberries, the dogwood provides a bright red contrast to the winter landscape.

Not Too Inviting

150128_Chairs in Snow by . Fuji X-T1, XF18-135mm @ 31mm, f/11, 1/180 sec, ISO 1600

These chairs, which are our Spring, Summer, and Fall hangout in the early mornings and late afternoons, did not look too inviting on this day.  Many hours during the year are spent here relaxing and enjoying our backyard pond and stream.  I am afraid it will be a while before we will be enjoying them again.

This photo looks like a B&W image, but is not.  The winter haze along with the snow and weathered wood of the chairs create the monotone.  If you look hard you can see a little color in the trees in the background.

After First Snow

150127_Mailbox_1st snow by . Fuji X-T1, XF18-135mm @ 35mm, f/5.0, 1/300 sec, ISO 1600

My leaning mailbox looks like the weight of the snow is pushing it over.  It adds interest without tilting my camera.  As I write this post, we are in the middle of a major winter storm.  Once over, I will get out and trundle through the snow to get new perspectives of our yard.

Winterberry in Snow

150126_Winterberry in Snow by . Fuji X-T1, XF18-135mm @ 39mm, f/11, 1/210 sec, ISO 1600

When I see bright color (especially red) contrasted in fresh snow I feel like I have received a gift.  These winterberries provide a treat all winter to both to my eyes and the local bird population.  Several years ago, we transplanted these out to our perennial garden to be our winter highlight.  The three flower supports wait all winter long for our mountain sage to emerge in the spring.

Lesson Remembered:  “When You See Red … Shoot!”