Category Archives: Historic Sites

Never Forget

“9/11 Memorial”
New York City

Twenty years have passed since the infamous attack on the American Nation. The memorial pays tribute to the 2,983 people who lost their lives in the 2001 and 1993 terrorist attacks. We must never forget those who were lost as well as the families and friends whose lives were impacted by the lost ones.

We must never forget about the terrorist events themselves. But we must also look beyond the events and search out the root causes that triggered them. Only by addressing and resolving the root causes will we be able to stop such events from occurring again in the future.

Last of its Kind Standing

“Barron Flour Mill”
Oaksdale, Washington

This old mill has quite a history. The mill was built in 1890 by J.G. Porter and sold to Harvey Gray. Joseph C. Barron, Sr. bought the mill from Gray in 1907 for $11,500. Joseph C. Barron, Jr. was born in 1909 and joined his father in the business. Junior took over the business and ran the mill until 1960 when he could not compete with the modern facilities. Barron then put in a small modern mill, capable of producing 500 lbs. per hour, in a small building behind his house. He ran the new mill until 1997. At the age of 88 he felt that it was time to retire and sell both his new mill and the old Oaksdale wooden mill to Mary Jane Butters. Mary Butters had worked with Barron for several years and is the owner of Paradise Farm Organics, Inc. which markets organic and heirloom grain products.

The Barron Mill is the only intact flour mill remaining in the Palouse. It has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. It is my dream to be able to tour the old mill some day in the future.

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Enjoyment and a Little Sadness

“Double Weeping Cherry and Naches-Selah Irrigation Flume”
Heatherwood Spring

As I look over our Double Weeping Cherry, I enjoy its beauty against the surrounding hills and the old Naches-Selah irrigation flume. But my heart also saddens. We have received information that the flume will be replaced with a pressurized pipeline this winter if the funding is approved. One of the first things that attracted me to this property was the beautiful hillside with the historic structure hugging its side. The need for efficiency and cost prevails and the historic flume built in the 1890’s will see its last use through this spring and summer. I will do my best to record this last remaining section of flume with my camera to remind me of a bygone era.

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It Is a Beautiful Sight

US Capitol, NW Perspective
Washington, DC

Walking around the Capitol, one receives different beautiful vignettes. These two were taken five years apart, about 20 feet from each other. Maybe this summer we will get the chance to return and get another perspective from this spot.

US Capitol, NW Perspective
Five Years Later

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Our Home

The Capitol East Entrance
Washington, DC

The Capitol is the house of the United States Government. We elect our government; therefore, it is our house too. It deserves all of our respect!

This image was taken in mid morning on a beautiful and warm summer day. There weren’t many people wandering about. Most were looking for a little shade.

The following is from a little different perspective. I stand in awe every time I get close.

US Capitol East Entrance, SE Perspective

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The Day After …

“US Capitol in Late Afternoon”
Washington, DC

The siege of our Capitol yesterday by the Trump-incited mob is a travesty of respect for our democracy. For me, it will never be forgotten.

I reflect on more sane times like this image taken on a warm summer late afternoon around a decade ago. I have been lucky to have had the opportunity to be able to freely walk around the various sections and chambers of the Capitol back in the Reagan administration. It made me proud to watch open Congressional sessions. I gained an insight and appreciation of our Democracy in progress. Those opportunities are no longer available to the general public.

Many have not had the opportunity to visit the Capitol. My aunt, who was a retired school teacher, saw the Capitol for her first time in her late years. Tears came to her eyes, and she exclaimed that every young student should have the opportunity to visit the Capitol to understand how our nation is governed.

For the next several posts, I will share images of the experiences I have had working in and visiting our Capitol.

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Remember and Overcome

World War II Memorial
Washington, DC

Let us not forget all those who have given their lives to give us the freedom that we now have. Let us look back in history and understand all the difficult situations we have encountered and faced as a nation. Let us remember what it took to overcome those times.

Our current situation with the Covid-19 virus is minor compared to what we have faced before. Yet we are fighting amongst ourselves on how to move forward. Rather than fight, let all of us focus on how we can move forward to assure a strong recovery and a safe environment. It will take patience, compromise, and sacrifice. But as many times before, we can do it!

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The “Painted Church” – 2

St. Benedict’s Catholic Church
Honaunau, Hawai’i

While the interior of the little “Painted Church” is lavishly colorful, the exterior is a simple white structure. I could feel the history surrounding the church through it’s old, but well maintained, grave yard and gardens. It is a beautiful and peaceful site on the gentle sloping sides of Moana Loa.

Little “Painted Church”

St. Benedict’s Catholic Church
Honaunau, Hawai’i

The “Painted Church” is a must see little gem in the heart of Hawaii’s Kona coffee plantation area in South Kona. The church is on a peaceful hillside overlooking the coastline below. It was built by Belgian Catholic missionary Father John Velghe from 1899 – 1902. Father Velghe painted scenes of biblical stories along the church interior walls. He used the scenes to deliver his messages since most of his native Hawaiian parishioners could not read.

A history of the church can be found at the following link: https://keolamagazine.com/art/painted-church/

The Little Blue Church

St. Peter’s Church By The Sea
Kailua-Kona, Hawai’i

This little church was built in 1888 next to an ancient Hawaiian heiou. It is currently a Catholic mission and holding Sunday services.

When I drove past the church, it was late afternoon. The front of the church was in deep shadows. The sun glare dominated the background as it reflected off the ocean. It was a great opportunity for a B&W photograph.

Silent and serene the little church stood
against the brilliant glow from above.
What history does it have to tell?