Monthly Archives: January 2021

Hana Matoi #3

Hana Matoi Late Fall Growth
Heatherwood Japanese Garden

A few red and green leaves of late autumn growth contrast against the dried brown leaves of the spent leaves. Ice plants in their red and yellow winter color on the hillside frame the new leaves.

Below, the fragile disectum leaves of the Hana Matoi shade the spreading blue purplish green thyme below.

This concludes my Hana Matoi mini-project. Or does it? These six images in the last 3 posts were all taken on an overcast day. Early morning light and late afternoon light provide many additional perspectives. Different seasons display different colors. Snow, ice, rain, and dew create magical views. And there are always an abundance of opportunities for abstracts. An infinite number of images are yet to be discovered.

Hana Matoi #2

Hana Matoi Looking Down
Heatherwood Japanese Garden

This post continues my Hana Matoi mini project. Looking for a different perspective, I walked up and leaned into the tree. I stood on my tip toes, held my camera above my head and took this image looking down through the top leaves to highlight the structure of the trunk and branches. It looks like a good spot for a bird to nest.

The image below is from a perspective of walking on a semi-hidden path adjacent to the main Japanese garden path. The Hokkeji pulls a visitor’s eyes to the Hana Matoi and the garden hillside.

Hokkeji and Hana Matoi
Heatherwood Japanese Garden

Hana Matoi #1

Hana Matoi Japanese Maple
Heatherwood Japanese Garden

I love my morning walks through the garden with my camera. Many times I stop and take a photograph of something I have taken several times before. A couple of days ago I decided to give myself a little challenge to take purposeful photographs of some of our Japanese maples from a different perspective than I have before.

I walked around the little Hana Matoi from different directions and distances. I took close-up and distance images. I climbed above and got down on my hands and knees to just check things out. I used the tree as my primary subject and as a background. I used my feet as my zoom lens. After about an hour, I had around fifty images of different perspectives. I decided to make a small mini project of six images to attempt to characterize our little Hana Matoi Japanese maple.

The above image portrays the Hana Matoi near the entrance of Heatherwood’s Japanese Garden looking east. The maple welcomes visitors to the garden and introduces them to what is to come.

In the image below, the Hana Matoi bids the visitors goodbye as they round a bend and start to exit the garden.

The Caretaker

Yukimi Lantern Overlooking Pond
Heatherwood Japanese Garden

A little Yukimi lantern guards over our small pond. During the winter months we turn off the waterfall, which allows the surface of the pond to function as a mirror reflecting the rocks and trees above. For now it is peaceful and quiet. In two months, the water will be turned back on and the waterfall’s turbulence will excite the emergence of spring.

Come On In!

Japanese Garden Entrance
Heatherwood, Winter

Come on it! The curved path and rock border leads the way. The Hokkoji lantern provides a greeting. Branches of deciduous trees frame a vision of what may be. Conifers hint what may lie beyond as the fog creates a little mystery and maybe hides a surprise.

These are some of the thoughts and ideas that have gone into the design of Heatherwood.

Framed

“Selah Ridge – Framed”
Heatherwood, Winter

I constantly am trying to improve my photographic skills. Early this morning I was re-reviewing an on-line class from David duChemin titled “The Decisive Moment.” It was dark outside when I started the session. After I finished, I looked outside and saw that our garden was encased in fog. The decisive moment was at hand. I quickly slipped on my shoes and grabbed my camera. It was mysterical and magical outside. I enjoyed this moment and many more.

Related Images:

The Capitol Dome

Capitol Dome Ceiling and Windows

‘The Apotheosis of Washington’
U.S. Capitol Dome

I have been in the Capitol several times. Each time I enter is a new experience. I don’t know how to explain the feeling that engulfs me. It’s a combination of wonder, awe, respect, excitement, humility, pride, and much more. The above two images were taken looking directly up from near the center of the Capitol Rotunda. I was shivering with awe when I took these images and had a very difficult time trying to be steady enough to get a decent shot.

The Apotheosis of Washington was painted by Constantino Brumidi in 1865. It depicts George Washington rising to the heavens in glory. The fresco is 180 feet above the Rotunda floor.

‘Washington, Liberty, and Victory/Fame’

George Washington is flanked by two female figures representing Liberty and Victory/Fame. Thirteen maidens, symbolizing the 13 original states, surround the three main figures. Six groups of figures are painted around Washington, Liberty, Victory/Fame, and the thirteen maidens. These represent war, science, marine, commerce, mechanics, and agriculture.

‘War’

‘War’ is depicted by Armed Freedom and Eagle defeating Tyranny and Kingly Power.

Related Images:

It Is a Beautiful Sight

US Capitol, NW Perspective
Washington, DC

Walking around the Capitol, one receives different beautiful vignettes. These two were taken five years apart, about 20 feet from each other. Maybe this summer we will get the chance to return and get another perspective from this spot.

US Capitol, NW Perspective
Five Years Later

Related Images:

Our Home

The Capitol East Entrance
Washington, DC

The Capitol is the house of the United States Government. We elect our government; therefore, it is our house too. It deserves all of our respect!

This image was taken in mid morning on a beautiful and warm summer day. There weren’t many people wandering about. Most were looking for a little shade.

The following is from a little different perspective. I stand in awe every time I get close.

US Capitol East Entrance, SE Perspective

Related Images: