Author Archives: kgrafphoto

Leaves in the Grass

“Leaves in the Grass”
Heatherwood, Fall

The wind was blowing and leaves were falling. It was time to go out and play with my camera. Walking around looking at the blowing trees, I wasn’t coming up with anything that really grabbed me. I looked down at my feet and saw patches of leaves in the grass. I decided to try a slow diagonal pan using multiple exposures. Here’s the result.

Heatherwood Fall Colors #10

“Strolling Through”
Heatherwood Japanese Garden, Fall

Another beautiful fall day, another stroll through the garden! My strolls through our garden with my camera remind me of the path shown of the little kids in the cartoon “Family Circus.” I usually start from the path, but soon deviate up and over the rocks, up the hillsides, around the trees and shrubs looking for details and vignettes I have not appreciated before. When I get back to the path I pause and sometimes look back to see where I came from, as I did in this photo. I encounter a surprise discovery of color, textures, and shapes.

Heatherwood Fall Colors #9

“Autumn Brilliance”
Heatherwood Japanese Garden, Fall

A Gift
A slice of light,
Autumn’s color
Such a delight!

Just before the sun fell below the western ridge above Heatherwood, it broke through the clouds and lit up this thin sliver of our Japanese Garden with its radiant rays. A few moments later it was gone. What a wonderful gift!

Heatherwood Fall Colors #8

“Liatris Glory”
Heatherwood Meadow, Fall

These Liatris were once a brilliant purple in their summer prime. Their beauty remains even after the blooms have long shed their color. Part of nature’s glory in our meadow is what is left behind. The late afternoon sunlight creates an emphemeral feeling of fleeting moments. I anticipate the liatris will present a different version of beauty as the late fall frost and winter snow decorates them.

Heatherwood Fall Colors #7

Kotoji, Waterfall, and Color
Heatherwood Japanese Garden, Fall

Reds, oranges, yellows, and greens. along with the Kotoji lantern highlight this vignette in our Japanese-style garden. Water flows from above to a pond below. Two Japanese maples, a weeping larch and nine different conifers surround the scene.

Heatherwood Fall Colors #6

Japanese Garden Path
Heatherwood Fall

Like a Stream

Like a stream,
my path meanders
through Nature’s fall glory.

I love walking around Heatherwood’s formal and informal paths. Autumn’s beautiful color is everywhere, but it is fleeting with the coming of colder temperatures. A daily walk through the garden brings me pleasure as I enjoy the present moments, reflect on the past, and anticipate the coming days.

Heatherwood Fall Colors #5

Russian Sage & Yarrow
Heatherwood Fall

“Purple and Gold” is my favorite color combination. Being from the University of Washington, how can I help not having these being my favorites? Go Dawgs!!!

Fall and Husky football are synonymous. September and October have not really felt like fall with no Husky football. But, the short season is scheduled to start on 7 November. It will be a different type of season, but at least the young athletes will get to play if things don’t change.

In the meantime, my focus has been in our garden, working and enjoying the fall colors. Throughout the meadows and rock gardens, the primary colors are purple (asters, Russian sage, etc.) and gold (rudbeckia, yarrow, etc.). Reds, yellows, greens and oranges highlight the trees.

Heatherwood Fall Color #4

“Fall Roses”
Heatherwood Fall

The roses are hanging on to their last burst of color. They have provided five months of beautiful enjoyment. It is now time for them to rest. The following is Mary’s perspective:

Fall Roses

As the end of the summer comes, 
one last gasp of velvety red hangs quietly from the stem.

The season of roses gave us color and imagination 
with every gaze of the thirteen rose bushes planted here two years ago.

Some made their way inside, but most lost their petals 
in the summer winds and carpeted the ground with red, pink, yellow, and white.

Now the cold nights are here, and the fall sky grays dully 
during the shortening days.

Here, two red blossoms hang on, sharing their last gasp of fragrant beauty, 
delicate yet defiant of the nature of things.

The uncut rose hips signal a winter nap to get ready for next year’s bloom, 
and their cycle reminds us of the ebb and flow.

Thank you, little roses, for teaching us that the difference 
between the end and the beginning is simply a little time to get ready.

                                                                           Mary Graf, 2020

Heatherwood Fall Colors #3

Liquidamber Styraciflua ‘Worplesdon’ (Sweet Gum)
Heatherwood Fall

A pair of liquidambers frame the entry area to Heatherwood. I planted them three years ago, before we added the other entryway planting areas and replaced the flowering plum trees with Green Vase Zelkovas. I am attracted to them because of their prominent upright shape, their brilliant fall color, and their “spikey” fruit.

I first planted three liquidambars in our Woodinville, WA garden 25 years ago. I did not have much luck. The first winter after I planted them, we had a very wet snow storm followed by a freeze. The trees still had their leaves and the weight of the snow and ice bent them over to the ground. While we lived there, they never regained their form. Our first year in Fountainville, PA we planted a row of five liquidambers along the road in our front yard. They became the star of our front yard landscape. So when I moved back to Selah, I had to add a pair to a prominent place in our landscape.

Heatherwood Fall Colors #2

Oak Leaf Hydrangea
Heatherwood Fall

Oak Leaf Hydrangeas are my favorites with their four season interest. In the spring, their dark green leafs unfurl. Summer brings out their beautiful conical flowers. Brilliant fall colors surround the faded brown blossoms in the autumn. In the winter most of the leaves drop leaving their exfoliating cinnamon-brown bark and their brown flower heads. A light dusting of snow highlights their beauty.

Heatherwood displays several Oak Leaf Hydrangeas throughout the garden, including a few in the Oak Grove.