Tag Archives: Mountains

A Nice Day’s Drive

Mt. Hood and Columbia Gorge
Oregon and Washington

On a clear day, it is hard to beat the drive down to Bend, Oregon from Eastern Washington along US Highway 97. Leaving the Yakima Valley, the snow peak of Mt. Rainer is in the NW, and Mt. Adams overlooks the valley from the west. Reaching Goldendale, Mt. Adams is to the NW and Mt. Hood is to the SW. Turning the bend on Highway 97 heading down into the Columbia Gorge, Mt. Hood is dead ahead (as in this image). Climbing back out of the Gorge to the Oregon Plateau, Mt. Adams is to the north and Mt. Hood is due west. Continuing south past Shaniko, one sees a little turn out with a clear view of the Cascade Range. From here, Mt. Adams is in the far north, Mt. Hood is in the NW, and Mt. Jefferson, Mt. Washington, and Three-fingered Jack are to the west and SW. Traveling south out of Madras Mt. Jefferson rises prominently above the farm lands to the west. Approaching Redmond, the Three Sisters and Broken Top are seen to the west and SW. Then Mt. Bachelor rises up as you enter the Bend area. It is a pretty impressive four hour drive on a clear day, which is pretty common in sunny Eastern Washington and Oregon!

Capitol Reef: Skyline Point #2

Skyline Point – The Henrys

Back to black and white.  I photographed this image in the middle of my last afternoon at Capitol Reef.  Who says you can’t create a good image in the middle of the day.  It was a beautiful afternoon.  The overhead sun lit up the Henry Mountains as well as provided nice shadows in the valley below.  I had the point all by myself.  It was a wonderful and peaceful feeling.  Looking down at the cliff walls and valley below, I was experiencing over 100 million years of history.  Human existence is pretty insignificant in the scheme of the natural wonders of our planet.  Let us all protect it for future generations.

Alabama Hills #3

Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, CA

This image is looking due west from the eastern side of the Alabama Hills.  The Sierras still have a little snow.  Notice the difference in the erosion patterns on the Alabama Hills boulders and the the sharp eastern Sierras.  Both ranges were formed near the same time.  Nature does funny things.

Getting Ready …

Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, California

I am getting ready for a photography workshop with John Barclay and Mitch Dobrowner at Capitol Reef in southern Utah.  Part of the preparation is to select images of past work to show to the workshop group.  I’ve spent the last two days reviewing my images over the past year.  My focus for this workshop will be black and white photography.  Overall, I am disappointed in my progress in 2018.  I could not identify many individual stellar single images that stand completely by themselves.   However, I did notice that I have several good images when taken together tell a story of the feeling I had experiencing a particular site.  A collection of my images is stronger than any single image.  For the next few days I will post a series of images from the Alabama Hills last April.

The Alabama Hills is a series of rounded rock hills and rock formations on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range near Lone Pine, California.  Mt. Whitney towers above the range.  Since the 1920’s the rugged area has been used as a location for over 150 movies and TV show’s.

This image was taken looking northwest over some large boulders of the Alabama Hills toward the eastern Sierras.

“Beartooth”

Beartooth Peak

The sharp peak is “Beartooth.”  It does look like a sharp tooth. I can imagine the size of the bear that would have this peak as a tooth!

As I observe the wonder of nature that surrounds me, I like to let my imagination run loose. Here, I tried to place myself in the footsteps of our Native Americans and the lore that they created to attempt to explain the life around them.  I could spend hours just sitting, seeing, and letting my mind explore.  When I do so, I tend to drive the people around me a little crazy.  Most of my creative work is done when I am by myself.

Experimenting with Moods

Pilot Peak

I am focusing on trying to create various moods with my black and white images.  This image of Pilot Peak was shot in midday light.  I added contrast along with dodging and burning to get this “late evening” mood.

The image below is processed with a B&W conversion with just a little contrast and brightness adjustment.  It captures more of the detail, but lacks feeling (my perspective).

What is your preference?